Programs

GOAL OF THE BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMS

The principal goal of the baccalaureate programs in the ECE Department is to provide students with the fundamentals of electrical or computer engineering so that they have an excellent base for a successful engineering career. This includes building a sufficient reading knowledge and analytical capability so that the graduate can continue to expand their knowledge as their field of interest and scope of electrical and computer engineering fields change.

DESIGN IS THE HEART OF ENGINEERING

Because design is the heart of engineering, design is integrated throughout the programs, starting with ECE 101, Introduction to ECE, and moving on to circuits and laboratory courses, ECE 203, ECE 213, and ECE 206L. Design continues in computer-related courses, ECE 238L and ECE 344L, in electronics, and in other courses throughout the program. The design process culminates with a capstone Senior Design sequence that includes ECE 419 and ECE 420. The goals of this design experience are to provide a team-based project experience that enables students to apply the fundamentals of electrical and computer engineering to identifying, formulating and solving engineering problems related to a significant and realistic project.

ABOUT THE COMPUTER AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING FIELDS

Both computer and electrical engineering have been and continue to be dynamic fields that provide exciting and excellent career opportunities. Computer engineers and electrical engineers use mathematics, physics, and other sciences together with computers, electronic instrumentation, and other tools to create a range of systems including integrated circuits, telecommunication networks, wireless personal communication systems, diagnostic medical equipment, robotic probes, radar systems, electrical power distribution networks, hardware and software systems, operating systems, computer organization and data structures, and computer networks.

These fields have changed the way we live and work. The continuous need to improve and discover new systems makes computer and electrical engineering professionals more sought after than ever before. The Bachelor of Science programs in computer engineering and electrical engineering in ECE at UNM provide students with the skills necessary to compete in such a rapidly changing discipline.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The present demand for computer and electrical engineers is strong and the employment rate for UNM graduates has been high. Demand is expected to remain strong, with continued expansion especially in the areas of microelectronics, optoelectronics, communications, bio-engineering, and computers and digital systems. Both computer and electrical engineers are employed by large corporations as well as by small companies, in various governmental agencies and laboratories, by universities and research institutes, and as private consultants. The career work is varied and includes research, product design and development, production, sales, and management. It also provides opportunities for interaction with other engineering disciplines and people working in sciences such as chemistry, physics, and mathematics.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

The EE program is divided into several areas of concentration, or tracks: Digital Systems, Electromagnetics, Microelectronics, Optics, Power/Energy Systems, Signals and Systems, and Systems and Controls. A Power and Energy track is the most recent addition, reflecting the sustainability and "green" objectives of today's engineering disciplines. See the EE Curriculum Sheet for more details.

ECE TRACK COURSES AND TECHNICAL ELECTIVES

Both the Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering programs offer areas of specialization, or tracks.  Students must take two classes from the track of their choice. In addition, technical electives are required by both programs. Technical electives are developed in consultation with your academic advisor and can be taken from ECE, Computer Science, Physics, Math or other engineering-related courses 300-level or above. (ECE 231: Intermediate Programming is the only 200-level exception allowed in the EE program only.) Below is a list of track areas, courses required for each and technical elective credit hours required for by each program.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING OPTIONS

  • Systems and Controls:
    ME 481/581 – Digital Control of Mechanical Systems 
    ECE 446 – Design of Feedback Control Systems  

  • Smart Power Systems:
    ECE 482/582 – Electric Drives and Transformers
    ECE 483/583 – Power Electronics
    ECE 484/584 – Photovoltaics
    ECE 488/588 – Smart Grid Technologies
     
  • Signals and Communications:
    ECE 439 – Intro to Digital Signal Processing
    ECE 442 – Intro to Wireless Communications
     
  • Microelectronics:
    ECE 471– Materials and Devices II
    ECE 474L/574L/NSMS 574L – Microelectronics Proc

          OR

            ECE 421/523 – Analog Electronics
            ECE 424 – Digital VLSI Design 

  • Electromagnetics:
    ECE 460/560 – Intro to Microwave Engineering
    ECE 469/569 – Antennas for Wireless Com Sys
    ECE 495 – Computational Methods for Electromagnetics
    ECE 495 – Plasma Physics I

  • Digital Systems:
    ECE 338 – Intermediate Logic Design
    ECE 438 – Design of Computers 

          OR

            ECE 231 – Intermediate Programming and Eng Prob Solving
            ECE 331 – Data Structures and Algorithms 

  • OptoElectronics:
    ECE 471– Materials and Devices II
    ECE 475 – Intro to Electro-Optics and Opto-Electronics 

Technical Electives are approved 300-level and above courses developed in consultation with a student’s academic advisor. These can be taken from ECE, Computer Science, Math, Physics, or other engineering-related courses.  ECE 231 - Intermediate Programming is the only 200-level exception allowed for the EE program only.

Electrical Engineering:  3 credits required

COMPUTER ENGINEERING

The CompE program offers two tracks: software and hardware. Students must take two classes from the track of their choice. The tracks and appropriate technical electives give the student a broad education in the track of their choice. See the CompE Curriculum Sheet for more details.

ECE TRACK COURSES AND TECHNICAL ELECTIVES

Both the Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering programs offer areas of specialization, or tracks.  Students must take two classes from the track of their choice. In addition, technical electives are required by both programs. Technical electives are developed in consultation with your academic advisor and can be taken from ECE, Computer Science, Physics, Math or other engineering-related courses 300-level or above. (ECE 231: Intermediate Programming is the only 200-level exception allowed in the EE program only.) Below is a list of track areas, courses required for each and technical elective credit hours required for by each program.

COMPUTER ENGINEERING OPTIONS

  • Hardware Emphasis
    ECE 338 – Intermediate Logic Design
    ECE 438 – Design of Computers

  • Software Emphasis
    ECE 335 – Integrated Software Systems
    ECE 435 – Software Engineering 

3+2 B.S./M.B.A

The School of Engineering recognizes that many engineers become managers of engineering programs and projects and thus require training in business methods beyond their engineering training. In cooperation with the Anderson School of Management (ASM) at the University of New Mexico, the School of Engineering offers a “3 + 2” program of studies leading to the B.S. and M.B.A. degrees in five years. This program involves selecting core and technical electives that are compatible with both degree programs and applying to the M.B.A. program at the end of the junior year of engineering studies. For more information on the 3+2 program contact Valarie Maestas.

SHARED CREDIT PROGRAM

The School of Engineering offers a Shared Credit Degrees Program designed to allow students to complete a B.S. and M.S., or a B.S. and M.Eng. degree in five years (depending upon the student’s mathematics preparation upon entering UNM as a first-year student). To accomplish this, some courses are counted towards both the Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees. For more information on the shared credit program contact Valarie Maestas.